migration | Christina Felschen

migration | Christina Felschen

Undocumented – and indispensable

published in German by ZEIT ONLINE on February 28, 2017; translated in September 2017 >>

Harvest workers, nannies, craftspeople: Eleven million people live in the US without papers, nothing goes without them. Trump wants to deport them anyway. A life full of fear.

Sharing memories with strangers

text and photos published by the Göttingen University alumni network, September 2017 >>

Former students of Göttingen University live all over the planet. More than 80 of them recently met in Berkeley, California, remembering good old WG and Mensa times.

There is no „America First“ science

published in the magazine of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), pp. 8-11, May 2017 >>

Climate change is a lie and science does not need any exchange: Donald Trump has an “alternative” understanding of what is true – much to US researchers’ chagrin. A conversation with the political scientist Beverly Crawford from Berkeley University, who is currently researching Fake News.

“A different America”

translation of a feature published November 12, 2016, by ZEIT ONLINE >>

In Oakland thousands take to the helicopter lit streets each night since the election, protesting hate crimes and a police state. But the demonstrators are also at odds with each other.

Crossing

broadcasted on German public radio SWR on November 7 and 8, 2016 >>

Kat Rodriguez has one of the hardest jobs along the US Mexican border. She supports Central American families in finding relatives who went missing on their journey to the US. All too often, they find their bodies in the Sonoran Desert behind Kat’s house. On her mission to stop the deaths, Kat crossed the desert on foot with 70 women, men, teenagers and me. Join us in my radio feature.

The Taliban on their heels

part of the photo exhibition “…und plötzlich diese Stille” (…suddenly there is silence), on display in the townhall of Wadersloh, Germany, as of April 20, 2016 >>

In Germany, Kainat can finally go back to school. Her family fled from a remote Pashtun village still ruled by the Taliban, who forbid her to leave the house. In rural Westphalia, the eleven of them easily make friends as they are all avid football players. All of them except one-year-old Sana who prefers sitting on the ball to kicking it.

Frantic with worry – why so many men escape without their family

part of the exhibition “…and suddenly there is silence”, on display in the townhall of Wadersloh, Germany, as of April 20, 2016 >>

Sulyman is angry. Angry with himself, because he cannot do anything but “sleep, eat, drink” – in a house with 40 other worrisome men. And he is angry with the authorities. Six months have passed since his application for asylum; six months, in which his wife and small children have persevered between the front lines waiting for a family reunification visa. What, if the Syrian war is faster than the German authorities?

First times – Iranians in a German village

part of the photo exhibition “…und plötzlich diese Stille” (…suddenly there is silence), on display in the townhall of Wadersloh, Germany, as of April 20, 2016 >>

Farkhondeh*, Kurosh and their two daughters were betrayed. While they were on vacation, the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution broke into her house in Tehran and found figures of angels and crosses. Evidence. As Christians, they would have been immediately arrested upon entry. A smuggling truck was their salvation – but first, it was nearly their end.

“Too safe to die, too poor to live”

part of the photo exhibition “…und plötzlich diese Stille” (…suddenly there is silence), on display in the townhall of Wadersloh, Germany, as of April 20, 2016 >>

Marjeta and her friends aren’t refugees and yet they applied for asylum because they can not apply for a visa. They come from a so-called safe country of origin”, Albania, and might be deported anytime. To rid her family of hospital debts, they need to earn money in Germany. A local company wants to employ them, but their work permit is still pending.

Invisible neighbors

This timeline is part of my research on the situation of undocumented migrants in Arizona and California, supported by the American Council on Germany’s McCloy Fellowship in Journalism.