Text

Text

How Clearview helps the Trump administration target undocumented immigrants

published on the NUDGED blog, March 14, 2020 >>

A small US company is selling an app that might end our ability to walk down the street anonymously. Among its clients: authoritarian states and US immigration enforcement. Jacinta Gonzalez, an organizer with the NGO Mijente, talked with us about why this puts the 11 million undocumented people in the United States at an even higher risk for deportation.

“It was the perfect storm”

Published on the NUDGED blog, March 18, 2020 >>

Before 700,000 Rohingya fled the genocide in Myanmar in 2017, the military had riled up millions of users against the group in a hate speech campaign on Facebook. Why did the company not intervene? And could this happen again? Human rights experts Matthew Smith (Fortify Rights) and Alan Davis (Institute for War and Peace Reporting), who both witnessed the events leading up to the genocide, shared their insights with me on the phone.

The techie resistance

Published on the NUDGED blog, March 6, 2020 >>

Dirty data, greed for gain and a lack of diversity in the tech sector: There are many reasons why algorithms discriminate. But lawyers, regulators and, most importantly, critical techies have started standing up against A.I.’s destructive potential. Will human intelligence win?

“Algorithms are opinions embedded in code”

published on the NUDGED blog, February 28, 2020 >>

Tech companies have taken over the power to make decisions for us. That can be convenient as long as it concerns playlists or navigation. However, under the guise of “objectivity”, their algorithms also categorize humans and reinforce social inequality.

Fenced In, Fenced Out

German version (with photo essay) published February 14, 2017 by ZEIT ONLINE >>

In the US Mexican borderlands, even Trump voters oppose the president’s plan to erect a border wall. They fear that even more immigrants will die in their backyard.

“We all want our ideas to be heard”

published by deutschland.de on the occasion of the Internet Governance Forum >> (German version >>) in November 2019

How can citizens be involved in governing by contributing their wishes, ideas and expertise? And how can leaders use big data to make their work more transparent and prevent corruption? Beth Simone Noveck, law professor and director of the GovLab research center in New York, advises governments worldwide on open governance – for example Barack Obama during his time in office and, since 2018, the German government. In this interview, she talks about this democracy of small steps and the chances and challenges of Germany’s Digital Council.

“I want to encourage people to be themselves”

published by Alumniportal Deutschland in November 2019 >> and in German >>

Mayowa Osinubi from Atlanta, Georgia, is constantly trying out new genres: She modelled, directed a documentary film and started both a YouTube channel and a feminist comedy show. She currently lives in Berlin as Chancellor Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. In the interview she talks about how the internet gave her the feeling to belong – a feeling she was missing offline.

Pinelopi’s odyssey

published by Letter, the magazine of the German Academic Exchange Service DAAD >> (and as a short version on the DAAD website >>)

When Professor Pinelopi „Penny“ Goldberg applied for the position of chief economist at the World Bank in 2018, it was not her first application to the bank. Thirty years before she had applied for an internship, but was rejected. She took it as a challenge, which brought her from Freiburg to Yale and finally to Washington D.C. nonetheless.

“Ms Lemper, Marlene Dietrich would like you to call her back!”

published by German Embassy Washington D.C. and germany.info, directing + editing: Wiebke Nauhauser, cinematography: myself

An international icon for her acting, singing and style: in 1939, Marlene Dietrich became a US citizen and took a clear stand against the Nazi dictatorship in her homeland. 80 years later, German performer Ute Lemper, likewise world famous and living in New York, has dedicated a production to Dietrich – inspired by a phone call from the legend herself.

Dance, dance, dance

published by Lufthansa Magazine, August 2018, print and online >>

The city that never sleeps had an old dancing ban in place, from 1926 – until the current mayor overturned it. We visit some night owls as they ­celebrate their first summer of freedom.